doi: 10.5191/jiaee.2018.25402

An Analysis of Evaluation Methods Implemented in Studies Published in the Journal of International Agricultural and Extension Education from 1994 to 2018: A 25 Year Review

Theresa Pesl Murphrey
Taniya J. Koswatta
Kim E. Dooley
Texas A&M University
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Leslie D. Edgar
University of Georgia
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Abstract
Evaluation has been identified as a critical pathway to meet the grand challenges facing agriculture to feed the world. Understanding evaluation models and practices used in articles published in the Journal of International Agricultural and Extension Education (JIAEE) allowed us to identify areas of focus, need, and improvement. This content analysis assessed JIAEE articles published from 1994 to 2018 for evaluation methods implemented according to characteristics outlined by Stufflebeam and Coryn (2014). This study initially identified 384 possible articles for consideration. Upon further assessment, 81 articles were identified as maintaining characteristics appropriate for review. Of these articles, the majority (70%) did not specifically identify an evaluation approach, even though 21% of all feature articles published over the past 25 years can be considered an evaluation. Few published evaluation articles specifically identified an evaluation approach; rather, the majority merely described the methods without using evaluation terminology, and the majority of the examined articles did not substantially cite evaluation literature (53%). Additionally, the majority of published evaluation articles were quantitative (56%). Researchers publishing in JIAEE should be assured that qualitative and mixed method evaluation studies are also acceptable. Evaluation studies focused on Stufflebeam and Coryn’s evaluation criteria of feasibility, safety, equity, and probity should be encouraged. Additionally, workshops or training opportunities to advance understanding in evaluation processes and procedures may be valuable.

Keywords: Evaluation, Evaluation Methods, Content Analysis, JIAEE